ITMT Mission

In The Meantime Men’s Group, Inc. is purposed to enrich, empower, and extend the lives of intergenerational black men, respectful of sexual orientation, through social, educational, health and wellness programs and services.
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Founder’s Message

Our Promise for the Future and Where We Began

By Jeffrey C. King
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Address:2146 W.Adams Blvd.Los Angeles,CA 90018

Tel: 323-733-4868
Email: inthemeantimemen@aol.com

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National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day

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February 7, 2020

National Black HIV/AIDS Awareness Day is an annual opportunity to help reduce HIV among African Americans by promoting HIV prevention, testing, and treatment. National HIV prevention efforts are reducing the burden of HIV infection among some African Americans, but more progress is needed. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) reports that in 2017, blacks/African Americans accounted for 43% of all HIV diagnoses in the United States and six dependent areas, despite making up 13% of the U.S. population.

  Healthcare Disparities in the Black/African American Community

  The United States Census Bureau estimates Black/AA living in Los Angeles County (LAC) at 9% or approximately 909,500 as of 2018.(1) In 2017, there were 51,438 persons living with diagnosed HIV (PLWH) in LAC. Twenty percent (20%) were Black/AA.(2)

In 2016, the highest overall rate of HIV diagnoses was among African Americans (56 per 100,000), followed by Latinos (19 per 100,000), whites (12 per 100,000), and Asians (6 per 100,000). These differences in rates were also observed by sex, most notably among African American females (17 per 100,000) where the rate of HIV diagnoses was 8 times higher than that of white females (2 per 100,000) and 5 times higher than the rate for Latinas (3 per 100,000).

  Among males, the rate of HIV diagnoses among African Americans (101 per 100,000) was 5 times higher than among whites (22 per 100,000) and 3 times higher than the rate for Latinos (34 per 100,000).(2)

  The highest rate of stage 3 diagnoses (Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome) (AIDS) was among African Americans (18 per 100,000). The rate of stage 3 diagnoses for African American females (6 per 100,000) was 9 times higher than the rate for white females (<1 per 100,000) and 3 times higher than the rate for Latinas (2 per 100,000). Among males, the rate of stage 3 diagnoses for African Americans (32 per 100,000) was 4 times higher than the rate for whites (9 per 100,000) and 3 times higher than the rate for Latinos (13 per 100,000).(2)

 
Black/AA Care Continuum as of 2016(3) Demographic Characteristics Diagnosed/Living with HIV Linked to Care ≤30 days Engaged in Care Retained in Care New Unmet Need (Not Retained) Virally Suppressed
Race/Ethnicity
African American 9,962 54.2% 65.9% 49.7% 50.3% 53.0%
Latino 21,095 65.4% 68.3% 55.7% 44.3% 59.7%
Asian/Pacific Islander 1,710 80.5% 74.6% 60.5% 39.5% 68.5%
American Indian/Alaskan Native 294 75.0% 70.1% 54.10% 45.9% 52.4%
White 14,778 75.2% 71.6% 54.5% 45.5% 64.9%
 

TREATMENT AS PREVENTION

  Reducing the risk of HIV transmission

Antiretroviral therapy (ART) has the potential to lower HIV incidence at the population level and to decrease prevalence by preventing secondary transmission of HIV. In 3 studies, including the PARTNER study, there were no documented cases of transmission between someone who was virally suppressed and their partner who was HIV negative, even after reporting unprotected sex.

According to the CDC

Undetectable viral load = effectively no risk of HIV transmission3

The sooner viral suppression is achieved, the shorter the period during which transmission can occur. Modelling studies indicate that incidence and prevalence of HIV on a community or population level might be lowered by expanded use of ART.2

What your patients need to know about treatment as prevention1,3,5
  • 1-6 months is the time required to achieve an undetectable viral load
  • 6 months (from the first undetectable test result) is the time required to maintain an undetectable viral load
  • If a patient achieves and maintains an undetectable viral load, there is effectively no risk of transmitting HIV


undetectable is prevention

Undetectable is Prevention

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Get PrEP LA

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Additional Information and Resources

From AHF: 

From In The Meantime Men’s Group, Inc: 

From CDC:

From the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Office of Minority Health:

From the National Library of Medicine’s AIDSource:

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